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 1 
 on: Today at 12:50:17 AM 
Started by afri - Last post by NCVinyl

More Canadian debt than ever before right now.
Rate increases in the next year will be critical: https://globalnews.ca/news/3434447/over-half-of-canadians-are-200-or-less-away-from-not-being-able-to-pay-bills/
Foreign investment is driving market currently IMO... but this doesnt change anything about my opinion, I would not buy a Condo. They are built like shit, Rising maintenence rates, air bnb, you have little control in decisions etc...

Renting doesnt "suck" with good investments its actually feasible that it makes more sense right now.

I personally don't rent because if I have the option to save $ for a bigger down payment that makes more sense for me personally.

I won't be leaving Toronto.

I also don't really care what Flew does or has this is the internet. My dick is 10 inches.

That's ur belly button, not ur dik

 2 
 on: Today at 12:19:35 AM 
Started by afri - Last post by memorize
5 is 4 lines too long

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 11:36:01 PM 
Started by afri - Last post by The Cubbies
Am I the only one feels that reading any hz forum post that's over 5 lines long is a severe waste of time?  So many essays in 2018.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 11:35:00 PM 
Started by afri - Last post by The Boogieman
Guelph is where it's at, y'all tripping

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 09:09:40 PM 
Started by afri - Last post by Leafy
Like with any other investment none of it is guaranteed but having a well thought out strategy can work for you. There are a variety of factors that are at play in Toronto's condo market and housing in general. That article is talking about the mid sized metropois (vancouver, sydney, toronto) where land values are appreciating greatly but is also questioning its sustainability because theyre assuming that those cities wont continue to have those levels of appreciation. Population trends kind of counter that point, the agglomoration of populations into cities (as opposed to rural settings or smaller cities) and the increased density requirement (subsequent demand) is happening at a faster rate. I don't believe demand has peaked in toronto yet. The highest paid wages are in these cities (likely: found in the business district, radiating outwards). With condos specifically speaking I do agree that there will one day be some great challenges with taking them down once their functional obsolescence is obsolete or they are no longer profitable. One day someone will be left owning a condo that is too expensive to take down. From the 2000s onwards toronto has had the second largest increase in condo towers built (first: city state Singapore that imports it's food...).

But if you're talking about investing rn, flew is lucky. His mortgage isn't large enough to amortize substantially which should offset the expenses incurred depending on things like the condos age, mostly location. Condos are marketed exclusively through lifestyle branding (beer store in liberty village is called beer boutique ;)) or modernity(New is better moral social disorder).

Depending on the life cycle of the building your strategy should change. The location is the most important thing. Investing in a condo pre ground break could be a great strategy for someone our age if the proposal looks like it is desirable and it will get built (your greatest risk is that it doesn't because even if you get initial investment back the time it would take for you to receive your initial investment the market would have gone up, time penalty incurred). There is the positive that you don't pay condo fees until completed, in which time the value has gone up.

Also something you should know is you don't pay capital gains tax on your principal property which means all profits in sale are untaxed with some excemptions. If you have the capital to play the housing market I would do it, I don't yet in toronto either. Flew winning somehow due to poker. Could be bluff. You could also just leave. I've thought about it too. Renting sucks but it's a reality rather than an option for most people in cities. I've known it as a reality for tooo long. Rent 2 damn high meme.

o 1 thing i do want 2 say is that there have been studies by ppl i forget that have shown the higher you live up in a condo the more paranoia you come to experience nd more isolation u feel because u r in closer proximity 2 ur neighbours but have n idea who they r usually.


More Canadian debt than ever before right now.
Rate increases in the next year will be critical: https://globalnews.ca/news/3434447/over-half-of-canadians-are-200-or-less-away-from-not-being-able-to-pay-bills/
Foreign investment is driving market currently IMO... but this doesnt change anything about my opinion, I would not buy a Condo. They are built like shit, Rising maintenence rates, air bnb, you have little control in decisions etc...

Renting doesnt "suck" with good investments its actually feasible that it makes more sense right now.

I personally don't rent because if I have the option to save $ for a bigger down payment that makes more sense for me personally.

I won't be leaving Toronto.

I also don't really care what Flew does or has this is the internet. My dick is 10 inches.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 04:51:54 PM 
Started by Kula - Last post by Koufax
Wouldn't RPM make more sense?

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 04:42:55 PM 
Started by afri - Last post by pickle rick
Like with any other investment none of it is guaranteed but having a well thought out strategy can work for you. There are a variety of factors that are at play in Toronto's condo market and housing in general. That article is talking about the mid sized metropois (vancouver, sydney, toronto) where land values are appreciating greatly but is also questioning its sustainability because theyre assuming that those cities wont continue to have those levels of appreciation. Population trends kind of counter that point, the agglomoration of populations into cities (as opposed to rural settings or smaller cities) and the increased density requirement (subsequent demand) is happening at a faster rate. I don't believe demand has peaked in toronto yet. The highest paid wages are in these cities (likely: found in the business district, radiating outwards). With condos specifically speaking I do agree that there will one day be some great challenges with taking them down once their functional obsolescence is obsolete or they are no longer profitable. One day someone will be left owning a condo that is too expensive to take down. From the 2000s onwards toronto has had the second largest increase in condo towers built (first: city state Singapore that imports it's food...).

But if you're talking about investing rn, flew is lucky. His mortgage isn't large enough to amortize substantially which should offset the expenses incurred depending on things like the condos age, mostly location. Condos are marketed exclusively through lifestyle branding (beer store in liberty village is called beer boutique ;)) or modernity(New is better moral social disorder).

Depending on the life cycle of the building your strategy should change. The location is the most important thing. Investing in a condo pre ground break could be a great strategy for someone our age if the proposal looks like it is desirable and it will get built (your greatest risk is that it doesn't because even if you get initial investment back the time it would take for you to receive your initial investment the market would have gone up, time penalty incurred). There is the positive that you don't pay condo fees until completed, in which time the value has gone up.

Also something you should know is you don't pay capital gains tax on your principal property which means all profits in sale are untaxed with some excemptions. If you have the capital to play the housing market I would do it, I don't yet in toronto either. Flew winning somehow due to poker. Could be bluff. You could also just leave. I've thought about it too. Renting sucks but it's a reality rather than an option for most people in cities. I've known it as a reality for tooo long. Rent 2 damn high meme.

o 1 thing i do want 2 say is that there have been studies by ppl i forget that have shown the higher you live up in a condo the more paranoia you come to experience nd more isolation u feel because u r in closer proximity 2 ur neighbours but have n idea who they r usually.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 12:42:18 PM 
Started by afri - Last post by Leafy
Condos in toronto typically have high ROI's. It's definitely a sign of success and definitely a good decision in this present time.



?????????

No idea what you're talking about.

Quick Google Search: https://www.canadianrealestatemagazine.ca/news/are-carrying-costs-in-toronto-condos-too-high-to-make-high-rois-234116.aspx

“It’s getting harder and harder in places like Toronto and Vancouver to buy a home, like a condo, and rent it and have it make any sense as an investment because you’re paying $1,000 per square foot,” he said. “You’re paying $500,000 for a one-bedroom condo apartment that’s 500 square feet and you’re going to rent it for $2,000 a month, but when you add up your mortgage, your condo fees and taxes, it doesn’t cover it.”

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 11:34:13 AM 
Started by afri - Last post by memorize
Everyone on SH has been saying they were retiring after the season for like 3 years  ::)
just when i thought i was out, SH pulls me back in. but with SH leaving as well, i'm free!

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 10:32:14 AM 
Started by afri - Last post by Thrill HZ
I get that in general owning is better than renting but at the end of the day it's still an apartment. It's one thing to own several condos that generate passive income if you're renting them out and another thing to be making mortgage payments on a communal living situation.

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